Research

Below is a list of research related to attendance

The reports on this page are listed alphabetically and examine the issue of chronic absence nationwide and in selected communities. Use the search box to find research using the author name. See the early education, elementary, secondary and other research categories on the right. To submit new research, please contact us.

State of Chronic Absenteeism and School Health: A Preliminary Review for the Baltimore Community

The Baltimore Student Attendance Campaign and Elev8 Baltimore, April 2012. To address the problem of health-related absenteeism, Elev8 Baltimore and the Baltimore Student Attendance Campaign collaborated to prepare a preliminary review of absenteeism and school-based health services (referred to in this report as school health) in Baltimore City. This review aims to analyze existing data, policies, and programs to create…
Published:   April 2012

Strategies for Student Attendance and School Climate in Baltimore’s Community Schools

Researchers interviewed the coordinators in community schools identified as having comparatively higher student attendance and more positive school climate than peer community schools. Having clearly designated roles, reliable protocols and procedures, and a leader who consistently communicated expectations to parents and students helped ensure that community schools could maintain high attendance and a positive school climate.
Published:   October 2017

Strengthening Schools by Strengthening Families: Community Strategies to Reverse Chronic Absenteeism in the Early Grades and Improve Supports for Children and Families

Nauer, Kim, Andrew White and Rajeev Yerneni. Center for New York City Affairs at the New School, October 2008. The Center for New York City Affairs at The New School conducted its own an analysis of chronic absence in New York City public schools. It found that more than 90,000 children in grades K through 5 (more than 20 percent…
Published:   October 2008

Taking Attendance Seriously: How School Absences Undermine Student and School Performance in New York City

Musser, Martha. The Campaign for Fiscal Equity, May 2011. The Campaign for Fiscal Equity works to ensure New York City students’ right to a sound, basic education. In this study, they found that absenteeism presents a large barrier to securing that education. The CFE analyzed attendance records, state assessment scores, and demographic factors for 64,062 fourth-graders attending 705 New York…
Published:   May 2011

The Attendance Imperative: How States Can Advance Achievement by Reducing Chronic Absence

Attendance Works. Released in September 2013 and updated in September 2014, this brief describes the steps that states can take to reduce chronic absence including: building public awareness, tracking and publicly reporting chronic absence rates for schools and districts, using attendance as a metric in school improvement efforts, sharing best practices with educators and parents, and enabling interagency efforts among…
Published:   September 2013

The Connection Between Missing School and Health: A Review of Chronic Absenteeism and Student Health in Oregon

Henderson, Tia. Upstream Public Health, October 2014. Upstream Public Health looks “upstream” at factors in communities, at home, and at schools that lead to chronic absenteeism. The report reviews data and research on student absences — finding that unexpected factors such as unstable housing, fear of bullying, and punitive school discipline policies as well as health conditions such as hunger,…
Published:   October 2014

The Detrimental Effect of Missing School: Evidence from Urban Siblings

Gottfried, Michael A. There is evidence suggesting that missing school negatively relates to academic achievement. However, it is a difficult task to derive unbiased empirical estimates of absences in their influence on performance. One particular challenge arises from the unobserved heterogeneity in the family environment, which may relate to both absence behavior and school performance. This article provides the first…
Published:   February 2011
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